Lycaenid Butterflies (Blues and Hairstreaks)

Group: 
Butterflies

These species have the familiar names of hairstreaks, coppers and blues. Usually small butterflies with males being brightly marked.

The information about this group of species has been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail:

Green Hairstreak

Callophrys rubi
Click species photo for details of this species:

Well camouflaged and not always easy to find. 


 

Brown Hairstreak

Thecla betulae
Click species photo for details of this species:

An elusive butterfly that spends most of its life in the canopy of ash trees and so is rarely seen.


 

Purple Hairstreak

Quercusia quercus
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An elusive butterfly that spends most of its life in the canopy of oak trees; difficult to see and harder to photograph.


 

White Letter Hairstreak

Satyriumw-album
Click species photo for details of this species:

Mainly a species of the leaf canopy of large trees so rarely seen.


 

Small Copper

Lycaena phlaeas
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Open grassy fields, downlands and even heathland are the places to look for the brilliantly coloured small copper butterfly.


 

Small Blue

Cupido minimus
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The smallest British butterfly favouring small patches of kidney vetch. Very limited in range.


 

Silver-studded Blue

Plebejus argus
Click species photo for details of this species:

A heathland butterfly found from late June until early August on the heathland of Purbeck and surrounding areas.


 

Brown Argus

Aricia agestis
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An uncommon species found mainly, but not exclusively, on chalk and limestone grassland from May right through until mid-September.


 

 

Common Blue

Polyommatus icarus
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A common species seen from early June until late October. It likes rough, open ground (especially chalk downland) where they can find an abundance leguminous flowers. 


 

Chalkhill Blue

Lysandra coridon
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A butterfly that prefers sunny chalk and limestone hillsides. The males are quite large and a silvery-blue colouring with black markings.


 

Adonis Blue

Lysandra bellargus
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A brilliantly coloured blue butterfly, rare in the United Kingdom as a whole but quite common in parts of Dorset.


 

Holly Blue

Celastrina argiolus
Click species photo for details of this species:

The most likely blue to be seen in gardens and not uncommon across Dorset


 

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