You are here

Tiger and Ermine moths

Click the pic!

To aid users of mobile devices as well as those with a mouse or laptop finger pad this site uses a simple image-based menu system. Virtually every picture you see (images and photos) are links to more information arranged in a sort of top-down structure. See an image, click or tap on it to open a new page.

Group: 
Moths

Striking moths, brightly coloured and that acts as a warning to preditors as most of this family are poisonous!

The information about this group of species has been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail:

Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Sites List Records List Original Tweets Guidance Notes

Forester

Adscita statices
Click species photo for details of this species:

A rare species in Dorset found in only a few locations.


 

 

Five-spot Burnet

Zygaena trifolii
Click species photo for details of this species:

An uncommon species in Dorset and difficult to distinguish from its six-spot cousin.


 

 

Six-spot Burnet

Zygaena filipendulae
Click species photo for details of this species:

A vivid metallic slate grey and crimson moth seen in countless numbers by day in July


 

Buff Ermine

Spilosoma luteum
Click species photo for details of this species:

A lovely little moth, the buff ermine is, as you might expect, a buff colour with a few dark dots on it. As with other ermines, it has a furry head covering which is quite distinctive. It is a nocturnal species so is rarely seen but it does come to light readily so you might see one at your window if you leave the curtains open after dark.

White Ermine

Spilosoma lubricipeda
Click species photo for details of this species:

I always love to find a white ermine in the moth trap, they are such beautiful creatures. White ermine is such an apt name too, a furry white texture with small black spots, this moth would be at home in the House of Lords! Just look at that wonderful furry head, it could almost be a wig!

Muslin Moth

Diaphora mendica
Click species photo for details of this species:

You could be forgiven for thinking that this was a white ermine moth that had just come down a sooty chimney! It is a very closely related species of the family Arctiidae although of a different genus. It is interesting, however, that it is the male that is this brown colour, the female is a cream/white although it has far fewer dark spots than the white ermine.

Ruby Tiger

Phragmatobia fuliginosa
Click species photo for details of this species:

The ruby tiger is a species that likes open habitat with bushes and scrub. It uses common plants such as dandelions and docks for its larvae to feed on so where it occurs it can be common. Occasionally seen by day but mainly a nocturnal species. In Dorset it flies during May and June and then a second brood appears in August.

Please note that this species does not have black wing tips as would appear from my photograph, tht is just shadow; sorry!


 

Wood Tiger

Parasemia plantaginis
Click species photo for details of this species:

A rare species found in very few places in Dorset.


 

 

Cream-spot Tiger

Arctia villica
Click species photo for details of this species:

Flying from mid-May to July this is a species that can easily be disturbed and seen during the day.


 

 

Photo by:
Peter Orchard

Garden Tiger

Arctia caja
Click species photo for details of this species:

This tiger moth is a visitor to the moth trap in July and August but I have found it on a couple of occasions during the day, seemingly fast asleep, on hedgerow flowers.

The garden tiger is quite easily recognised by that intricate black and white pattern on its wings although the actual pattern itself can vary between insects; indeed, it is thought no two are the same. It can vary in colour too from black through to chocolate brown

Scarlet Tiger

Callimorpha dominula
Click species photo for details of this species:

A day flying moth of river banks, water meadows, marshy areas and sea cliffs. A local species but common where it occurs.


 

Jersey Tiger

Euplagia quadripunctaria
Click species photo for details of this species:

The Jersey tiger is so called because it is a very common species in the Channel Islands although it does occur on the south coast of England. Some thrity or so years ago it was found mainly in Devon and Cornwall but has now spread in to Dorset where it can be seen flying by day, mainly in August.

Cinnabar Moth

Tyria jacobaeae
Click species photo for details of this species:

A frequently disturbed red and black moth that feeds on ragwort


 

Rosy Footman

Miltochrista miniata
Click species photo for details of this species:

A nocturnal moth found in woodlands and along mature hedgerows.


 

 

Buff Footman

Eilema depressa
Click species photo for details of this species:

A fairly common nocturnal species where there are mature trees nearby.


 

 

Photo by:
Peter Orchard

Common Footman

Eilema lurideola
Click species photo for details of this species:

At first sight this may seem a unique looking moth with a shape quite different to most but in fact there are eight or nine similar species and so it needs a second look before jumping to conclusions! It may the the common footman but some of the other similar species are common too and some look very much alike in shape and colouring.

Orange Footman

Eileme sororcula
Click species photo for details of this species:

The orange footman is generally considered to be a species of central southern England and so, not surpringly, is found here in Dorset. In places it can be quite a common species but rarely seen by day being a nocturnal species but it is attracted to light.