Locations and Access

  • Directions: 

    Take a A351 from Wareham to Swanage and as you approach Corfe Castle turn left towards Studland (the B3351). Follow that road until you come to Studland village and keep going towards the ferry. Shortly after passing through the village you pass a hotel on your left and then the turning in to the National Trust car park at Knowle Beach follows on your right.

    Access Points: 

    WARNING: I have not been able to test all of these co-ordinates, they are based on where I placed the markers so use with care!

    Name SatNav Coordinates
    Roadside parking 50° 40' 16.2444" N, 1° 57' 29.1528" W
    Alternative car park 50° 40' 36.498" N, 1° 57' 5.2092" W
    Main car park and visitor centre 50° 39' 6.7428" N, 1° 57' 16.6392" W
    Location Map: 

    The blue pin mark the approximate centre of the reserve, the yellow pin(s) mark the approximate locations of parking places that enable you to access the reserve.

    Potential Hazards: 

    Any walk in the countryside is going to have its potential hazards but the primary aim of this function is to forewarn less able people of difficulties they may face although some may apply to other people as well.

    Hazard Commentsort descending Description
    Open Water Extensive lake and some smaller ponds

    Open lakes or reservoirs are often found on nature reserves and are, of course, a habitat that some species thrive on. Whilst not a real danger open ater can be ab attraction for youngsters and for dogs. Always keep dogs on a lead (as they should always be on a reserve anyway) and keep children under close supervision. 

    Rough Ground The paths can be very sandy and heavy walking

    Nature reserves exist for the wildlife and plants that are found there and are not always visitor friendly, especially some smaller reserves. The ground on some reserves can be very rough going even when there are paths present and would not be passable by those who are less mobile.

    Loose Footings The sand on the dunes and at the top of the beach is very soft

    Some reserves, often coastal ones, can have loose footings on shingle, sand, even rocks. Not only can this be hazzardous they can be very tiring to walk across and one can sometimes find one has walked too far! 

    Bog and Myre Very boggy between the road and Little Sea

    Bog and myre on heaths can be lethal if you get stuck in them and often there is no help for miles around. On heathland it pays to keep to well made pathways and not to stray off into boggy areas. Never do this alone and always one person stay on firm ground. Helicopter rescues from such situations are not uncommon!

    Nearby Sites: 

    These are sites near to the one you selected. Distances given are VERY approximate! Click any photograph to go to the full details of that site.

    • Approximate Distance: 0 miles

      The area just inside Poole harbour entrance, to the south, known for wildfowl and wader watching in winter


       

    • Approximate Distance: 2 miles approx

      A large area of heathland lying behind Studland and between the Purbeck Ridge and Poole Harbour. A national nature reserve.


       

    • Approximate Distance: 3 miles

      Visited by many for the walk to Old Harry Rocks but the south facing escarpment slope provides an abundance of flowers and is a prime site for butterflies. 


       

    • Approximate Distance: 3 miles approx

      A spring visit to see the ramsons is recommended!


       

    • Approximate Distance: 4 miles approx

      An easily accessible part of the Purbeck Ridge with lots of flowers and insects to see in summer. 


       

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