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23rd June

Portland Bird Observatory - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 23:45
A very low-key day on the bird front with little more of interest than Manx Shearwaters on the move off the Bill: a few were trickling west through the morning, whilst a stronger eastbound movement of up to 200 per hour got going once the wind freshened during the afternoon.

With fresher conditions having set in moth numbers continued to dwindle but there were still hints of fresh immigrants arriving, with 2 Vestals and 2 Small Mottled Willows amongst the modest catch at the Obs and another Small Mottled Willow at Fortuneswell.

One of the more interesting events of this week has been the addition of Lunar Hornet Clearwing to the island moth list. We've already mentioned the discovery of the first adult that was found clinging to a mist-net in the Obs garden and further singles were found in the same circumstances both yesterday and this morning; it was pretty obvious that the species must be resident in the garden and it didn't take the ever enthusiastic Andy Dyball long to discover signs of larval feeding, an exited pupal case and finally another adult on at least three sallow trees there. The pencil-width pupal exit holes - several with scatterings of sawdust underneath - were quickly spotted up to about a metre off the ground, and it wasn't long before one was found with an exited pupal case at its entrance:

...two adults, with a pupal case just to the right of the lower insect:

...Andy photographing an adult on one of the trees photos © Martin Cade:

Also on the clearwing front, Six-belted Clearwings are now on the wing quite plentifully, this one came to a pheromone lure yesterday at Inmosthay © Ken Dolbear:

...and a bit of an oddity in the butterfly line, this aberrant female Silver-studded Blue was at Tout Quarry © Ken Dolbear:
Categories: Diaries

Sightings - Friday 23rd June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 22:42
Spoonbill - 4 on Lytchett Fields.

juvenile Bullfinch - Merley Park © John Hammick
Black-headed Gull - Brownsea Island © Marcus Lawson
Categories: Diaries

22nd June

Portland Bird Observatory - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 23:30
 A reminder that there's an In Focus field event at the Obs between 10am and 4pm this Saturday, 24th June.
In much fresher and breezier conditions than of late the Common Rosefinch remained at Southwell but was seemingly always hidden from general view in private gardens. The change in the weather didn't really perk things up on the land at the Bill, with another 90 Swifts and a Grey Heron through overhead and another new Chiffchaff at the Obs the only reports of note. Offshore, at least 30 Common Terns off the Bill were presumed to be Lodmoor breeders on feeding forays; 7 Manx Shearwaters, 7 Mediterranean Gulls, 2 Common Scoter and a Whimbrel also passed through/lingered there. The only reports from elsewhere were of up to 10 Mediterranean Gulls and 4 Sandwich Terns at Ferrybridge.

Overnight mothing was not quite as busy as in recent nights with fog and a freshening breeze pegging back numbers, but there signs of a small arrival of new immigrants/dispersers. At the Obs, a Marbled Grass-veneer Catoptria verellus was the immigrant highlight, with 6 Diamond-back Moth, 4 Rusty-dot Pearl, 3 each of European Corn-borer and Silver Y, 2 each of Rush Veneer and Dark Sword Grass, and singles of Olive-tree Pearl, Hummingbird Hawkmoth, Small Mottled Willow and Scarce Bordered Straw making up the rest of the tally.

The Common Rosefinch lingered on but was mobile and generally elusive - it very occasionally gave some half-hearted song and was only seen when it visited various birder's back gardens © Pete Saunders:

...we made an early morning attempt to sound record it during which time it only called/sung twice in an hour:


From the evidence of the national records it would seem as though Marbled Grass-veneer might be in the process of colonising south-east England, but it remains a decent rarity in this part of the world - last night's specimen constituted only the second island record 
Categories: Diaries

Sightings - Thursday 22nd June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 23:14
Spoonbill - 5 on Brownsea Lagoon
Elegant Tern - roosted on Brownsea Lagoon then left at c4.45am.
Little Gull - 1 Langton Herring.

Dartford Warbler - Hengistbury Head © Clinton Whale
Categories: Diaries

Sightings - Wednesday 21st June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Wed, 21/06/2017 - 23:02
Spoonbill - 5 Brownsea Lagoon.
Osprey - 2 Wareham Channel.
ELEGANT TERN - 1 on Brownsea mid-afternoon then late evening to roost in front of Mac Hide.
Common Rosefinch - 1 in a Southwell garden.

Some history of the Elegant Tern from Birdguides:
"Bird C has also been seen only in France during the breeding season, and primarily at Banc d'Arguin. The first sighting of this bird came on the reserve in 2002; it was caught on 3 July 2003 and fitted with a metal ring (FT67249) on the right tibia and with three plastic rings — one white on the right tarsus, and green above yellow on the left tarsus (J Gernigon). The bird, identified as a male by behaviour, bred with a Sandwich Tern for several years (2005–07, 2009, 2010, 2013) in the Banc d'Arguin colony, but also on one or two occasions in the Noirmoutier colony. Bird C has also been seen once in winter — close to Cape Town, South Africa, on 1 January 2007 (Tony Tree). Though it was ringed a long time ago, further sightings are otherwise sparse — though this is probably because of its choice of the inaccessible Banc d'Arguin as a breeding site and because it has also long been considered a hybrid because of its perceived less 'classic' appearance."
Full article here:
http://www.birdguides.com/webzine/article.asp?print=1&a=5856Some info on it's visit to South Africa:
http://safring.adu.org.za/story_content.php?id=189As this bird has been DNA tested and proven to be an Elegant Tern then it should be accepted as the first confirmed British Record although there have been 3 sightings previously which will most likely prove acceptable now:2005 Dorset, Stanpit Marsh, Christchurch Harbour, adult, 10 May
2002 Caernarfonshire Black Rock Sands, Porthmadog, 23–26 July
2002 Devon, Dawlish Warren, 18 May; same, 18–19 July.Elegant Tern - Brownsea Lagoon © Paul Morton
Elegant Tern - Brownsea Lagoon © Paul Morton
Categories: Diaries

21st June

Portland Bird Observatory - Wed, 21/06/2017 - 22:11
Yesterday's Common Rosefinch remained overnight at Southwell to provide a nice mid-summer highlight: after announcing its presence with strident song for a while at dawn it became a good deal more furtive as the day went on and was never visible other in private gardens. Also in the finch line, a Siskin was an odd summer turn up at the Bill, but the day had few other surprises, with another new Chiffchaff at the Bill, 70 Swifts and 3 Sand Martins through overhead there and 18 Common Scoter, 8 Mediterranean Gulls, 5 Black-headed Gulls and 3 Manx Shearwaters through/lingering offshore.

Despite the continuing high temperatures immigrant moth activity remained quite subdued, with 29 Diamond-back Moth, 11 Silver Y, 3 Rusty-dot Pearl, 2 Rush Veneer and an Olive-tree Pearl making up the totals at the Obs.

Although the rosefinch showed well at times - usually when it visited feeders - it quickly sung much more fitfully after its noisy start and we weren't able to get a sound recording of it © Debby Saunders (stills) and Martin Cade (video):



It'll be interesting to see if this unseasonable Siskin wandering out as far as the Bill proves to the vanguard of a strong autumn passage - are they on the move elsewhere yet? © Martin Cade:

Categories: Diaries

20th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Tue, 20/06/2017 - 22:47
With a fresher easterly breeze beginning to set in conditions were a little more conducive for fieldwork and there were a couple of surprises to show for the day's efforts. With the month slipping away it was looking like Common Rosefinch - perhaps the classic Portland June rarity - might be a no-show this year so a brief spell of song from one hidden in the depths of the Southwell gardens during the afternoon was welcome even if the bird couldn't be seen. For the most part the rewards from the sea at the Bill - 10 Manx Shearwaters, 7 Common Scoter, 2 Balearic Shearwaters, 2 Mediterranean Gulls and a Sandwich Tern - were to be expected, but the 2 fly-by Red-breasted Mergansers there were much less seasonable. The day's other reports included 70 Swifts and 4 Sand Martins through over the Bill and 3 new Chiffchaffs and a new Blackcap at the Obs.

Overnight moth-trapping was very busy indeed; immigrant activity was still quite limited but there was much more evidence of short-range dispersal than in recent nights. Immigrant totals at the Obs included 27 Diamond-back Moth, 6 Silver Y, 5 Rusty-dot Pearl and singles of Rush Veneer, Olive-tree Pearl and European Corn-borer, with further singles of Olive-tree Pearl and European Corn-borer at the Grove.

Auks below their breeding ledges at the Bill today © Roger Hewitt:

Having spent the last three nights on miscellaneous mothing forays around the island and elsewhere we've got behind with updates. The moth highlight has been Portland's first Lunar Hornet Clearwing that was found clinging to a recently opened mist-net at the Obs shortly after dawn yesterday; over the years we've had a couple of subliminal glimpses of insects that we felt sure must have been one of other of the hornet clearwings so yesterday's record was very welcome in finally providing confirmation of Lunar Hornet - presumably by far the more likely of the two species to occur here © Martin Cade: 
Categories: Diaries

Sightings - Tuesday 20th June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Tue, 20/06/2017 - 22:44
Storm Petrel - 15+ in Lyme Bay 1.6km off shore from Charmouth
Spoonbill - 5 still on Brownsea Island lagoon
Osprey - 1 Wareham Channel
Hobby - 2 Morden Bog, 1 Morden Park Lake
Green Sandpiper - 1 Abbotsbury Swannery, 1 Lytchett Fields
Categories: Diaries

Sightings - Monday 19th June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Mon, 19/06/2017 - 23:04
Common Scoter - 34 past Portland Bill
Manx Shearwater - 6 past Portland Bill
Spoonbill - 5 Brownsea Island
Osprey - 1 Middlebere
Hobby - 1 West Bexington
Whimbrel - 4 past Portland Bill
Black Redstart - 1 Blacknor, Portland

Juvenile Green Woodpecker at Hengistbury Head © Joe Murphy
Swallow fledgling at Canford © Roger Peart


Stonechat at Hengistbury Head © David Wareham
Categories: Diaries

19th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Mon, 19/06/2017 - 21:58
There's limited enthusiasm for comprehensive fieldwork in the current hot weather but a few odds and ends did make the day's list. Early leavers over the Bill included 30 more Swifts, 2 more Sand Martins (we hadn't been told of the first single two days ago when we compiled the update for that day) and a Redshank; sea passage there included 34 Common Scoter, 6 Manx Shearwaters, 4 Whimbrel and 3 Mediterranean Gulls. The only other reports were of a Black Redstart at Blacknor (there's been a series of singles between the Bill and Blacknor this summer - could they be breeding somewhere on the west side?) and the first juvenile Chiffchaff at the Bill (presumably a dispersing local breeder).

Moth news to follow tomorrow.


Categories: Diaries

18th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Mon, 19/06/2017 - 10:03
Very hot and none too exciting again today. The only reports from the Bill were from the sea, where 53 Common Scoter, 3 Whimbrel, a Manx Shearwater and a Common Tern passed through; elsewhere, 7 Sandwich Terns passed through Ferrybridge where 5 Mediterranean Gulls were settled.

Sandwich Terns over Ferrybridge © Pete Saunders:

Although they've been on the wing for several weeks on the mainland, Portland Lulworth Skippers seem usually to be late emergers; our first record for the year was only yesterday, with this one at Broadcroft BC Reserve today © Ken Dolbear: 

There are some great displays of Pyramidal Orchids throughout the island at the moment - these were also at Broadcroft © Ken Dolbear:

Categories: Diaries

Sightings - Sunday 18th June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Sun, 18/06/2017 - 22:50
Osprey  - 1 Middlebere
Red-footed Falcon - 1st summer female at Morden Bog

Red-footed Falcon at Morden Bog © Aidan Brown




Pochard at Radipole © David Wareham


Categories: Diaries

17th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Sat, 17/06/2017 - 22:07
Extremely little to show for today's fieldwork that was pretty hard going in the scorching heat. A Yellow Wagtail at the Bill and 2 Sanderling at Ferrybridge were the day's only worthwhile sightings.

The moth-traps were bursting with numbers but quality was lacking: singles of Olive-tree Pearl at the Obs and Delicate at the Grove were easily the best of a limited selection of immigrants.

Bird interest might be limited but the island is certainly awash with bugs; among the random selection attracting the photographer's attention were a Marbled White at the Bill © Debby Saunders:

...and at Admiralty Quarry, mating Silver-studded Blues, a Cinnabar Moth and a Mullein caterpillar feeding on Common Figwort (the other insect in this photo is evidently a Figwort Weevil Cionus scrophulariae) © Ken Dolbear:


Categories: Diaries

Sightings - Saturday 17th June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Sat, 17/06/2017 - 21:43
Spoonbill - 5 Brownsea Island
Osprey  - 1 Lytchett Bay, 1 Middlebere
Green Sandpiper - 3 Lytchett Fields
Little Tern - 1 Brownsea Island

Reed Warbler at Stanpit Marsh © Joe Murphy
Greenfinch at Hengistbury Head © David Wareham
Categories: Diaries

16th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Fri, 16/06/2017 - 22:49
The fine, warm weather continued and there were precious few signs that the summer rarity was about to pop up. Two new Chiffchaffs at the Obs looked to be early departers as were the light trickle of Swifts and single House Martin heading out to sea overhead. Two each of Sanderling and Dunlin made up the migrant wader tally at Ferrybridge, where 2 Shelducks also dropped in. The only other reports were of 10 Manx Shearwaters through off the Bill and a lone Gannet in Portland Harbour.

Usually at this time of year we have a quick look back at how common migrants fared during the spring and, as before, it's easiest to gauge this by way of the Obs ringing totals that are based on a pretty consistent effort from one year to the next; these totals - together with comparison figures for 2010-16 and the mean for that period - were as follows:


As we'd drawn attention to earlier, it's immediately obvious that Willow Warbler was the big winner this spring with a total nearly twice as high as the recent spring average; in fact, their total wasn't far off equalling the all-time record for a whole year (which stands at 2113 in 2012). For our other regulars it really wasn't too bad a season: both Whitethroat and Garden Warbler were more than a third down on their recent averages (...this perhaps didn't come as a surprise given that both had very poor years in 2016) and the two 'crests didn't recover after their indifferent showings last autumn, but everything else was hovering either side of average.
Sanderling and Shelducks at Ferrybridge this morning © Pete Saunders:


...a Gannet off the Bill © Martin Cade:


...and a Hornet Hoverfly Volucella zonaria at Bottomcombe © Ken Dolbear:

Categories: Diaries

Sightings - 16th June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Fri, 16/06/2017 - 19:57
Osprey - 2 Middlebere
Categories: Diaries

Sightings - Thursday 15th June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Fri, 16/06/2017 - 07:15
Apologies for late post - IT problems

Osprey - 1 Arne
Buff-breasted Sandpiper - 1 Lytchett Fields 0600-0800
Little Gull - 1 Abbotsbury Swannery
Balearic Shearwater - 2 past Portland Bill
Quail - 1 singing from a field West Compton
Serin - 1 briefly Southwell
Buff-breasted Sandpiper Lytchett Fields copyright Ian Ballam


Categories: Diaries

15th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Thu, 15/06/2017 - 22:20
Not quite so hot and noticeably breezier today in the wake of the very weak weather front that passed through during the morning. Another brief Serin - this one heard calling at Southwell - was the only report of note on the ground, although a steady little passage of departing Swifts was evident overhead and included 70 leaving to the south from the Bill. The only other action was out to sea where 43 Manx Shearwaters, 23 Common Scoter, 7 Whimbrel and 2 Balearic Shearwaters passed by off the Bill.

A single Delicate at Blacknor was the only worthwhile oddity amongst the handful of immigrant moths trapped overnight.

A pair of mating Scarlet Tigers at Easton © Ken Dolbear:
Categories: Diaries

14th June

Portland Bird Observatory - Wed, 14/06/2017 - 22:21
On a lovely hot, sunny day interest was again pretty minimal. A Chiffchaff was the only new arrival at the Bill, where 4 Sandwich Terns and 3 each of Manx Shearwater, Common Scoter and Mediterranean Gull passed by on the sea. The only reports from elsewhere were of 3 Sanderlings, a Shelduck and a Grey Heron at Ferrybridge.

Immigrant moth arrivals seem to have utterly ceased, with a single battered Rusty-dot Pearl the only overnight capture in the Obs traps.

Hummingbird Hawkmoth, Marbled White and Silver-studded Blue at the Bill and Broadcroft BC Reserve today © Tony Hovell:



Categories: Diaries

Sightings - Wednesday 14th June 2017

Dorset Bird Club Sitghtlings - Wed, 14/06/2017 - 21:21
Osprey - 2 Middlebere
Eastern Common Tern (longipennis) - 1 possible Abbotsbury Swannery
Meditteranean Gull Brownsea Island copyright Clinton Whale
Linnet Hengistbury Head copyright David Wareham



Categories: Diaries

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Shetland Footprints: June 23rd

Purbeck Footprints - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 19:36


Yesterday we collected the new tent that had been sent from Aberdeen to replace the one that was no longer waterproof. It took three days for the tent to arrive and although it wasn’t really holding us back it was good to know that we would be a little more comfortable.And so we travelled further north.


The Isle of Unst was going to be home for the next couple of nights and this would be the northern most island we would visit and, at about 700 miles from home, it would be the northern most campsite too. When we got to the tiny fishing village of Uyeasound the skies were blue and water between us and the island of Uyea was calm and still with just a single Merganser and, the now customary, Seal for company. The evening was long and although it would not get much darker the sun had set to a soundtrack of Oystercatchers, Wheatears and the haunting call of the Snipe.

One thing we have learned about the Shetlands is that the weather can change almost instantly, from cloud to sun or the other way around.   

Overnight the wind picked up and blew straight across the sound bringing rain and trying its hardest to rip the tent from its ropes. Inside the tent wasn’t exactly calm either but it was built to stand up to worse than this so while the canvas whipped and pulsed and the poles buckled we waited, slept and woke on and off through the night.It is hard to say that we waited for dawn as it had been light all night but there seems to be a time when getting up and on is an ok thing to do. The wind was still blowing and low cloud joined the spray from the sea to make sure you got just wet enough but we walked up the hill to the hostel where a well-stocked kitchen could supply coffee. Lots and lots of coffee…The hostel has an old conservatory at the back, overlooking the campsite and across the sound to Uyea and from here we watched the weather attack our tent. Just off the beach, only a few meters from the tent a Grey Seal bobbed and watched, with the soulful expression that these now familiar creatures have mastered. In the skies above Gannet after Gannet swoops over the waves occasionally diving but spending more time escaping the Bonxies than actually fishing.When we reached coffee saturation point it was time to move on, further north, to find what we find.
Categories: Publisher

Shetland Footprints: An update

Purbeck Footprints - Thu, 22/06/2017 - 22:16
I was going to write a daily diary about we are up to here on The Shetlands, but I am now holiday blogger and, after wandering around as much of this place as possible, moving bases twice and not having a mobile signal leta lone wifi, I gave it up as a bad job. I will keep popping a few photographs on here though when I can and try not to bore you too much.
The last few days have been a mixture of sunshine and cloud and I have spent a fair bit of time wandering and trying to understand more about The Shetlands. This place is filled with over 4000 years of history and each phase of this is well worth exploring.
Today's best friend though was a beautiful but quite unpopular Pole Cat. Now these creatures are not really wanted on Shetland and they are actively kept from all islands but the mainland because of their threat to wild birds. Now I fully understand that but I really did enjoy my encounter with this young lady, which was far more than the Wheatear did!









Categories: Publisher

Shetland Footprints: Otter: first contact.

Purbeck Footprints - Wed, 21/06/2017 - 18:37
One of the creatures that I have been looking forward to photographing is the Otter. They can be seen at a few places around the islands but finding them can be tricky. A few days ago, at a small cove just south of our campsite, we found the remains of Sea Urchins and a few tell tale prints so we returned in the evening to watch and wait. It took a little time but eventually we spotted a lone Otter quite a way away that moved silently across the water from one side to the other fishing for what looked to be Eels. There was no way of getting close and the light was fading fast but these are the results of our first encounter.







Categories: Publisher

Shetland Footprints Day 4

Purbeck Footprints - Tue, 20/06/2017 - 21:49


When the weather is not right for photography less important things need to happen, like the shopping for food or the use of free wifi in community cafes, this leaves your diary clear for when the sun shines.  Here on The Shetlands the weather can change totally in less than an hour and this coupled with news of wildlife sightings can force an immediate reaction. This morning we could see the clouds starting to clear and we were just about to move when we got a tip off that Orcas may be in the area, so we dropped everything and charged down the coast trying to get one step ahead. We found a beautifully named headland called the Scult of Laward, a rocky outcrop just north of Sumburgh lighthouse that we had to ourselves and that gave us a view right up the coast past Mousa towards Noss. These islands had been mentioned as the latest possible sightings. This place was home to Arctic Terns, Eider Ducks, Oyster Catchers, Turnstone and a couple of Grey Seals so watching the seas was never going to be boring.




Now the problem with relying on previous sightings is that wildlife is, by and large, unpredictable. This seems doubly so for cetaceans but all you can do is keep your fingers crossed. Eventually patience paid off and three black fins broke the surface and headed straight into our bay, circled around the headland close to the shore and us. Being able to watch these incredible creatures at such close quarters was amazing and another reason for us making the journey north. It turned out that there were at least four Orca and they swam around the headland giving us superb views, views that in my opinion just can’t be beaten by any other animal.



 All too soon though they had disappeared from sight, leaving us with the dilema of whether to guess again and head off west or to leave them and move on.Well of course we didn't leave them, well not intentionally! A quick drive around to another bay, to the west, gave us stunning views of the Sumburgh Lighthouse but alas no more Orca.


Categories: Publisher

Celebrate Kingcombe Meadows with Summer Fayre

Dorset Wildlife Trust News - Tue, 20/06/2017 - 15:21

Dorset Wildlife Trust’s (DWT’s) Kingcombe Centre is hosting a weekend of events and activities to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of The Kingcombe Meadows Nature Reserve from Saturday 24th – Sunday 25th June. 

Categories: Publisher

Shetland Footprints Day 3

Purbeck Footprints - Tue, 20/06/2017 - 10:16


We started early this morning and left base camp before 7am with the weather showing promise but cloud remained stubborn and refused to allow too much Sun to break. We headed west to the long strip of islands known as Trondra with the intention of covering as many miles as possible. Running from north to south, with narrow strips of water between it and the mainland, Trondra had an appeal all of its own. The west coast of these islands is rough and rugged and has been twisted and buckled by countless years of tectonic forces,  the east though was calm and quiet, sloping gently to a water that was filled with pots and fishing bouys.


As the clouds parted, blue skies and bright sunshine meant that a return visit to Sunburgh was called for. The lighthouse stood high on the southern tip of the mainland and the cliffs around it are packed with Guillemots, Razorbills and of course the Puffin.




In the skies above Arctic Skuas joined the larger Bonxie (the local name for the Great Skua) to harass the smaller birds as well as the rabbits that call this place home. Taking a photograph of birds in flight is always difficult but on this occasion the wind helped making usually quick little birds stall and slow down just enough for a shot. When I am enjoying myself this much it is always difficult to tear myself away but there is only so many shots of Puffins you can take. Time to move on and enjoy the views as the skies cleared.
Categories: Publisher

Shetland Footprints Day 2

Purbeck Footprints - Mon, 19/06/2017 - 11:03


We docked at Lerwick just after 7.30 and it was clear that the heatwave currently covering the UK was not going to extend this far north. To be fair, we were ready for the fog and the rain as we had followed the forecasts all week and this did not dampen our spirits as much as it did our coats.The campsite we had chosen was a small community run site in a tiny village, by a tiny cove with a tiny beach about half an hour south of Lerwick. So, within a couple of hours of landing here and with the help of a couple of laughing Dutchmen, we had set up base camp and were wondering what to do about the waterfall that was steadily flowing through the roof and collecting into our very own Loch in the middle of the floor. By the time we had found a replacement tent and pitched it, the afternoon had arrived along with more rain and stronger winds. It would have been easy to find a café and spend the time wondering what more the weather would bring, but instead we went off in search of high cliffs, big waves and the always magical Puffin. 

The weather was perfect for seabird watching but not photography although I did manage to meet a friendly little Puffin who stayed close enough to pose before finding a place out of the wind. The day ended calmer and dryer than it had started and although the sun struggled to break free of the clouds we had a chance to spend a little time with a Common Seal and her pup.
Night was long in coming and it didn’t hang around for long, it does not get properly dark here at this time of year, and daylight brought the promise of better weather.


Categories: Publisher

Shetland Footprints: Day 1

Purbeck Footprints - Sat, 17/06/2017 - 12:00


The journey from Swanage to The Shetland Islands was always going to be a long one and was to be spread over two days. The plan consisted of the best part of twelve hours on the road, with a break after ten of them to take photographs of a wonderful school whose headmaster is a friend of mine, then on to Aberdeen and the ferry to Lerwick. A further twelve hours overnight on the water would see us arrive at about seven in the morning, with just about half an hour on Shetland roads to where we will be making camp.We didn’t have time to explore Aberdeen, which was a shame, but we did manage to find the coast road that followed the southern hills below the docks. This turned out to be a smart move as within minutes of getting out of the car a large male Grey Seal made its was slowly through the water. A single Eider Duck was a lovely sight when the sun broke through the clouds and I proudly mentioned his presence to a nearby RSPB lady. She gave me a flash of one of those smiles reserved especially for idiots before directing my attention to the other couple of hundred Eider that were sleeping on the rocks around the corner. 
It was then that the first of perhaps fifty or so Dolphins appeared in the distance and, for the next couple hours, I battled with the poor light to get the best shots that I could. This was by far the greatest number of Dolphins I had ever seen and to watch them breach over and over again was very special. A pattern of sorts quickly started to develop and it became possible to predict, although not with 100% accuracy, when they would jump from the water.



As the dolphins moved on, so did we as it was time to embark on the next stage of the journey: the overnight sailing to Lerwick. The Sun broke through, the skies cleared and, as we left Aberdeen with camera firmly pointed at the harbour entrance, there was absolutely no sign of the Dolphins that we watched earlier. 

As for the ferry, well I suspect that although I am not particularly well travelled, a ferry is just a ferry. We had reclining seats in the front bar and almost immediately after the bar had closed, everyone settled down for the night. This is not a busy crossing tonight but there are many people scattered across chairs as well as the floor, people that can sleep whenever or wherever they want. I don’t sleep fully but catnap, waking often to any sound whether real or imaginary. I have never been able to just fall asleep on command and here now, even though the place is quiet, there are far too many new things to see. The skies lightened just before three this morning and from then on waves, Gannets and Fulmars kept me amused. The sea, rougher than last night but still more fun than problem, is grey to match the clouds and the weather looks set to be exactly what was forecast. As we past Fair Isle, which is only just visible through the mist, there is only a couple of hours left and although I enjoy the rolling and pitching of the ferry I am looking forward to land and the next chapter.
Categories: Publisher

Plead for help to stop vandalism on Lorton Meadows Nature Reserve

Dorset Wildlife Trust News - Thu, 15/06/2017 - 15:21

A dry-stone wall seat on Dorset Wildlife Trust’s (DWT’s) Lorton Meadows nature reserve in Weymouth has been vandalised, and the wildlife charity is appealing for witnesses and anyone with information to come forward.  

Categories: Publisher

Get involved with the great Chesil Bioblitz

Dorset Wildlife Trust News - Wed, 14/06/2017 - 09:52

Dorset Wildlife Trust (DWT) is hosting an exciting and fascinating all day BioBlitz event* at its Fine Foundation Chesil Beach Centre on Sunday 25th June, with activities and events running from 8am to 5pm.  People of all ages are invited and encouraged to join in with this large-scale wildlife survey of Chesil Beach and the Fleet Lagoon on what promises to be a really fun and informative day.

Categories: Publisher

“Simon Says” – Keep calm and carry on from Paris

Dorset Wildlife Matters - Mon, 05/06/2017 - 17:01

The issue

This month is proving yet another critical time for the planet as the world looked nervously on to see if the USA pulls out of the Paris climate agreement and what will happen when they eventually did.  Few people and almost no reputable scientists, doubt the serious impacts that climate change will have on our environment, nature, society and economies.  Few also doubt that it is a primarily man-made phenomenon.

Even as a scientist myself I think of climate change in pretty emotive terms.  I recently watched a documentary on BBC4 about the Russian space programme.  Nothing to do with climate change.  But seeing pictures, as people were seeing for the first time back in the 1960s, of the vanishingly small, almost two-dimensional strip of fabulous life in an unimaginably large sea of completely inhospitable blackness of space made me, as it has most astronauts, reflect on how we have no choice but to look after our environment.  The Paris Accord, that has been so much in the news lately, is one such step to safeguard our future.

Figure 1: Life exists in a small sliver of space. https://fettss.arc.nasa.gov/collection/details/earth-atmosphere/

What is the Paris agreement?

Thrashed out in Paris in 2015, 194 countries agreed to a range of environmental pledges.  This was a landmark agreement, both because of the number of countries adopting the proposals, as well as the extent to which the proposals sought to address climate change.  To achieve their aim of keeping global average temperature rises to below 2°C and preferably below 1.5°C, governments effectively agreed to keep net (i.e. emitted minus removed carbon) emissions at zero. If they could keep to 1.5°C this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change.  Ahead of the Paris summit and not to be further negotiated, nations made pledges to limit greenhouse gas emissions covering 90% of all such emissions.  It committed countries to have a plan of action and to take steps to carry out those plans.  Whilst there was a commitment to achieve the targets, they are not legally binding and subject to international sanctions.  These commitments, though a significant step forward, would only limit global warming to 2.7°C this century – still way too high, so they all have to make new pledges and show how they plan to reduce emissions still further.

Figure 2: The Paris Accord was a triumph for diplomacy.  https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2015/12/the-most-stupendous-acronym-from-the-paris-climate-talks/419631/

When I was working for WWF at the UN in New York we were trying to get tiny commitments to ocean governance to protect ecosystems and fish stocks, but it was incredibly hard to get any changes because every country had a wide range of agendas it had to consider and didn’t want to upset the delicate balance with more or different international agreements.  Confidential deals between countries on issues completely unrelated to ocean management frequently scuppered what we thought was good progress.  So what was achieved at Paris was astonishing and indicated the severity of the situation climate change puts us all in.

Why governments and business should sign up

Governments realised they needed to do something about climate change because every one of the 194 are effected, some with significant economic, social and environmental effects.  Extremes of flooding and drought, such as we see in Dorset, will increase.  Drinking water, even here in Dorset will become scarcer and less reliable.  Fish stocks which we rely on for food will change and move, let alone the loss of coral reefs and the livelihoods that go with them.  Sea levels will rise inundating coastal areas and destroying some island communities. Food crops will change and be more at risk.  Insurance costs will increase, disaster provision needed will be greater, national security threatened. The list goes on and on.

Figure 3. The flooded river Frome in 2014 © Sally Welbourn

By making this such a multilateral attempt to reduce carbon emissions this should be less threatening to business.  Industries in different countries are therefore on far more of a level playing field.  Opportunities for access to low carbon technologies and services will be more readily available.  In most cases customer expectations can be met without losing a competitive edge.

The effect of the US pulling out

I believe that President Trump’s announcement to withdraw from the Accord will, at least for the time being, do little to harm our efforts.  As a campaign pledge many of his rank and file voters were holding him to, it isn’t surprising he made the announcement.  In fact The US cannot withdraw from the Accord for a further 3 years (until after the next presidential election), and the Accord was non-binding in any case.  So little will change, especially as so many US cities, states and companies have pledged to stay with the agreement in any case.  In making this announcement he both pleases his voters and does little of substance to change US participation.  The main concern is probably the threat to withdraw US financial support to help developing countries achieve their targets.  It remains to be seen if countries such as China, India, Canada and the EU step in to offer support in place of the US as that would also make good business sense for them.  China leads solar technology for example.

I believe those parts of the US that don’t continue to support climate change mitigation will become isolated and lose their competitive edge in the fast-developing global non-carbon economy.  Corporate evolution will mean they will wither and die.  Those elements that do support the Paris Accord, even in the US, will prosper.

Shareholder power

Can we do anything in Dorset?  I believe there is a lot we can do.  As individuals we can use our buying power to choose carefully what we purchase and from where.  As shareholders and investors we can either only invest in companies that are taking steps to reduce their emissions in line with Paris Accord targets, or use our voting power at AGMs to cause change.  Recently 62% of eligible voters (including the Church of England) required Exxon to assess the risks of climate change.  A great step forward and one that was reflected by the Exxon CEO’s criticism of the US decision.  We must also do our bit, no matter how small on the global scale, to use renewable energy and be as economical and efficient as we can by cutting down our energy consumption.  What is good for the planet is good for our pockets and good for Dorset.

Conclusions

As a conservationist I need to be an optimist. I firmly believe that far from damaging the world’s efforts to combat man-made climate change, the US decision has focussed attention on one, if not THE, most important issue facing our planet today.  It has strengthened resolve and informed or inspired all but the most hardened climate sceptics.  Let’s not panic, but rather stay calm and carry on saving this fabulous planet and county of ours.  After all, it’s all we’ve got.

 


Categories: Publisher

"Simon Says" - June Blog - Keep calm and carry on from Paris

Dorset Wildlife Trust News - Mon, 05/06/2017 - 15:55

This month is proving yet another critical time for the planet as the world looked nervously on to see if the USA pulls out of the Paris climate agreement and what will happen when they eventually did.  Few people and almost no reputable scientists, doubt the serious impacts that climate change will have on our environment, nature, society and economies.  But what will be the effect of the USA pulling out? 

Categories: Publisher

Old Harry to White Nothe Part One: The Birds

Purbeck Footprints - Sat, 03/06/2017 - 21:52
Walking the paths that follow the Purbeck cliffs is something that I do on a daily basis and I never get bored! Every now and again though I get the chance to jump on a boat and follow the coast taking photographs of our seabirds from the water instead of the land. This is challenging to say the least, you are constantly fighting against the movement of the boat and the waves as well as the birds themselves. Still, there are far worse ways to spend time and so this is the first part of our story and the real reason for the trip: the seabirds of the South Dorset Coast.
Guillemots are the most numerous, but there are Razerbills, Kittiwakes and a few precious Puffins. This is of course apart from the Herring, Black Backed and Blackheaded Gulls and the superb Sandwich Terns.

Razorbills & GuillemotsGuillemots
Guillemots
Kittiwakes
KittiwakePuffins

Puffins
PuffinGuillemot
Categories: Publisher

New website launched to explore the wildlife of Poole Rocks MCZ in Dorset

Dorset Wildlife Trust News - Thu, 01/06/2017 - 15:44

A new website has been launched with high quality audio visual images, to allow users to ‘dive-in’ and explore Poole Rocks Marine Conservation Zone (MCZ) and discover its wondrous and colourful marine life. 

Categories: Publisher

Purbeck Art Weeks

Purbeck Footprints - Mon, 29/05/2017 - 09:48
This weekend has seen the beginning of this year's Purbeck Art Weeks, a two week celebration of what the Isle of Purbeck has to offer and to give it's artists a well earned chance to show off what they do.
Once again, the Purbeck Footprints Gallery is taking part and I will also be giving a talk about this place and the photographs that I take, so I thought I would pop a few of my favourite shots on here too.










Categories: Publisher

Pages

Marbled white

DWT Flickr Group - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 19:00

john neal photography has added a photo to the pool:

Making the most of the last minutes of sunshine, late evening, Powerstock Common, Dorset.

Categories: Monitor

Coal House Cafe - Service Staff

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 18:24
Quick summary:  London Wildlife Trust is recruiting for a Cafe Service Staff member at the Coal House Cafe, our renovated grade II listed building set within Woodberry Wetlands, our award winning nature reserve that was opened to the public last year by Sir David Attenborough.

Based at: The Coal House Café, Woodberry Wetlands.

Full-time, permanent contract (shift pattern working)

London Wildlife Trust is a growing charity with a diverse range of projects and funding sources, and we are currently recruiting for a Cafe Service Staff member at the Coal House Cafe, set within Woodberry Wetlands

Salary:  £9.75 per hour Closing date:  2 July 2017 (All day) Contact details:  <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p>

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Categories: Monitor

Coal House Cafe - Chef

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 18:14
Quick summary:  London Wildlife Trust is recruiting for a Chef at the Coal House Cafe, our renovated grade II listed building set within Woodberry Wetlands, our award winning nature reserve that was opened to the public last year by Sir David Attenborough.

Based at: The Coal House Café, Woodberry Wetlands.

Full-time, permanent contract (shift pattern working)

London Wildlife Trust is a growing charity with a diverse range of projects and funding sources, and we are currently recruiting for a Chef at the Coal House Cafe, set within Woodberry Wetlands

Salary:  £11.00 per hour Closing date:  2 July 2017 (All day) Contact details:  <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p>

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Categories: Monitor

Coal House Cafe - Barista

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 18:14
Quick summary:  London Wildlife Trust is recruiting for a Barista at the Coal House Cafe, our renovated grade II listed building set within Woodberry Wetlands, our award winning nature reserve that was opened to the public last year by Sir David Attenborough.

Based at: The Coal House Café, Woodberry Wetlands.

Full-time, permanent contract (shift pattern working)

London Wildlife Trust is a growing charity with a diverse range of projects and funding sources. London Wildlife Trust is recruiting for a Barista at the Coal House Cafe, set within Woodberry Wetlands

Salary:  £9.75 per hour Closing date:  2 July 2017 (All day) Contact details:  <p> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p>

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Categories: Monitor

Willow Ermine (Yponomeuta rorrella)

DWT Flickr Group - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 17:27

Nick Dobbs has added a photo to the pool:

Willow Ermine (Yponomeuta rorrella). A relatively local species, occurring sporadically in much of England, though with an eastern and coastal bias.

As suggested by the vernacular name, the larvae feed on species of willow, especially white willow (Salix alba) and grey willow (S. cinerea). They feed gregariously on the leaves in a silken web, between May and July. The adult moths fly in July and August, and in common with others in the group, are readily attracted to light. Photo by Nick Dobbs, Bournemouth, Dorset 23-06-17

Categories: Monitor

Charity Fundraiser

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:57
Quick summary:  A job for summer, and beyond! With Summer now in full swing it’s a perfect time to change career, get outdoors and help your local wildlife.

Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust is looking for friendly, independent and self-motivated people to encourage members of the public to join the Trust.

Our Charity Fundraisers work independently at venues (pre-booked by our in-house team) such as local county shows/events, shops and garden centres.

If you have an interest in wildlife conservation and your local environment then we would love to hear from you. This is an excellent opportunity to bring your experience to a position where you can contribute directly to cause that you are passionate about.

Closing date:  25 August 2017 (All day) Contact details:  <p> Please contact Wildlife Fundraising for more information:</p> <p> HR@wildlifefundraising.org</p> <p> 0333 3207 273</p> <p> www.wildlifefundraising.com<br /> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p>

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Categories: Monitor

Silver Studded Blue , female

DWT Flickr Group - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:49

beaconschris has added a photo to the pool:

Plebejus argus , Argus-Bläuling
near Wareham in Dorset

Categories: Monitor

Queenswood Country Park Gift Shop & Visitor Centre Volunteers

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:44
About the role

We are looking for volunteers to help run a new visitor centre at Queenswood, providing members of the public with information, guidance about the Country Park and Bodenham Lake, as well as staffing the new shop! 

Job reference:  QWVOL Salary:  This is an unpaid, voluntary role but travel expenses can be reimbursed in accordance with our volunteering policy Closing date:  1 December 2017 (All day) Contact details:  <p> Michael Mackinnon, Queenswood Shop &amp; Event Supervisor</p> <p> Email: <a href="mailto:m.mackinnon@herefordshirewt.co.uk?subject=Queenswood%20Country%20Park%20Visitor%20Centre%20volunteers">m.mackinnon@herefordshirewt.co.uk</a></p> <p> Phone: 01432 530088</p> Location:  Queenswood Country Park & Arboretum, Dinmore Hill, nr Leominster, Herefordshire HR6 0PY

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Categories: Monitor

Queenswood Country Park family & education volunteers

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:43
Quick summary:  Fantastic opportunity for volunteers to help shape an exciting new events and education programme for children at Queenswood Country Park and Bodenham Lake. Get involved, and help connect children to nature in Herefordshire!

We are super excited to be able to welcome enthusiastic volunteers who are committed to engaging children with nature at Queenswood Country Park & Bodenham Lake Nature Reserve. Both these sites are soon to be managed by a partnership between Herefordshire Wildlife Trust and Herefordshire New Leaf, with an exciting array of events, Forest School and WildPlay sessions being held throughout 2016.

The bulk of commitment will be duing the school holidays, with a particular emphasis on the Easter and summer holiday seasons.

Job reference:  QW-ED-VOL Salary:  This is an unpaid, voluntary role but travel expenses can be reimbursed in accordance with our volunteering policy Closing date:  1 December 2017 (All day) Contact details:  <p> Hayley Herridge, Engagement Officer</p> <p> Herefordshire Wildlife Trust</p> <p> <a href="mailto:h.herridge@herefordshirewt.co.uk?subject=Queenswood%20Country%20Park%20family%20%26%20education%20volunteers">h.herridge@herefordshirewt.co.uk</a></p> <p> 01432 530088</p> Location:  Queenswood Country Park

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Categories: Monitor

Bird Identification by Sight and Sound

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:43
Date / Time Start date:  22 April 2018 - 10:00am - 3:00pm Summary:  Ever hear a bird but have trouble finding it with your binoculars? This course will show you how to identify a bird through its call, but also using sight if it's visible. By the end of the day you'll have the confidence to identify springtime birds. Includes an afternoon walk to put your new skills into practice. Book online at www.attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk/book. Main image:  Booking details Booking required?:  No Admission charge:  Yes Admission details:  £35 per person Audience:  Adults Contact name:  Attenborough Nature Centre Contact number:  0115 972 1777 Contact email:  enquiries@attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk Fully booked:  No Cancelled:  No Other details Mobility:  People with limited mobility please contact organiser in advance Wheelchair:  Wheelchair users please contact organiser in advance Location Meeting place:  Attenborough Nature Centre Address Location:  Attenborough Nature Reserve County:  Nottingham Postcode:  NG9 6DY Grid ref:  SK515339 Town:  Attenborough
Categories: Monitor

Moth (Anania stachydalis)

DWT Flickr Group - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:43

Nick Dobbs has added a photo to the pool:

Moth (Anania stachydalis). A rare species which is found in southern England and south Wales, flying from June to August, but quite skulking and only normally encountered at light. The larva feeds on woundwort (Stachys spp.) in a tube formed by rolling the edge of a leaf and securing with silk. It quite closely resembles the much commoner Phlyctaenia coronata but has shorter, blunter wings and subtle differences in the pale markings. Photo by Nick Dobbs, Bournemouth, Dorset

Categories: Monitor

Winter Bird Identification

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:30
Date / Time Start date:  14 January 2018 - 10:00am - 3:00pm Summary:  This day course focuses on the wildfowl, waders and other winter visitors at Attenborough. You'll improve your bird-watching and winter bird identification skills. Book online at www.attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk/book. Main image:  Booking details Booking required?:  No Admission charge:  Yes Admission details:  £35 per person Audience:  Adults Contact name:  Attenborough Nature Centre Contact number:  0115 972 1777 Contact email:  enquiries@attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk Fully booked:  No Cancelled:  No Other details Mobility:  People with limited mobility please contact organiser in advance Wheelchair:  Wheelchair users please contact organiser in advance Location Meeting place:  Attenborough Nature Centre Address Location:  Attenborough Nature Reserve County:  Nottingham Postcode:  NG9 6DY Grid ref:  SK515339 Town:  Attenborough
Categories: Monitor

Education Programme Team Leader

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:25
Quick summary:  We are seeking an experienced senior education specialist with business planning experience and an appetite to grow an outcome driven, financially sustainable education programme.

In April 2018, Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust will open our first education centre at Greystones Farm Nature Reserve, which a working organic farm with a rich heritage, including SSSI meadows, pristine rivers and a scheduled Ancient Monument. This is a pivotal moment for the Trust providing our first purpose built education facility and a fantastic opportunity to relaunch and grow our Education Programme.

Salary:  circa £27,000 Closing date:  24 July 2017 (All day) Contact details:  <p> If you would like to discuss the role in more detail please contact Gareth Parry - gareth.parry@gloucestershirewildlifetrust.co.uk</p> Location:  Bourton on the Water, Gloucestershire

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Categories: Monitor

Autumn Bird Identification

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:23
Date / Time Start date:  8 October 2017 - 10:00am - 3:00pm Summary:  In autumn large numbers of migrant visitors arrive on our shores to spend winter here. By the end of the day you'll have the confidence to identify both migrant and resident autumn birds. Includes an afternoon walk to put your new skills into practice. Book online at www.attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk/book. Main image:  Booking details Booking required?:  No Admission charge:  Yes Admission details:  £35 per person Audience:  Adults Contact name:  Attenborough Nature Centre Contact number:  0115 972 1777 Contact email:  enquiries@attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk Fully booked:  No Cancelled:  No Other details Mobility:  People with limited mobility please contact organiser in advance Wheelchair:  Wheelchair users please contact organiser in advance Location Meeting place:  Attenborough Nature Centre Address Location:  Attenborough Nature Reserve County:  Nottingham Postcode:  NG9 6DY Grid ref:  SK515339 Town:  Attenborough
Categories: Monitor

Elephant Hawkmoth (Deilephila elpenor)

DWT Flickr Group - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:15

Nick Dobbs has added a photo to the pool:

Elephant Hawkmoth (Deilephila elpenor). The English name of this moth is derived from the caterpillar's fanciful resemblance to an elephant's trunk. The adults are attractively coloured pink and green affairs, with a streamlined appearance. They fly from May to July, visiting flowers such as honeysuckle (Lonicera) for nectar. The larvae feed mainly on rosebay willowherb (Epilobium angustifolium), but also other plants as well, including bedstraw (Galium). Photo by Nick Dobbs, Bournemouth, Dorset 23-06-17

Categories: Monitor

Minibeast Madness

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 15:14
Date / Time Start date:  22 August 2017 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm

A mega bug hunt, learning all about the creatures that live under leaves and logs, create a butterfly feeder to take home to attract pollinator; sweep through long grass to catch some butterflies and bees and all things small.

This is perfect for toddlers just starting to explore the natural world or budding young Attenborough’s who want to learn more. 

Summary:  A fun, engaging way to learn about the world of creepy crawlies, from the hungry caterpillar to the ugly bug ball join us for a morning of fun with bugs Main image:  Booking details Booking required?:  Yes Admission charge:  Yes Admission details:  £3.50 for ages 2-5 years and £5.00 for ages 6-11 years Audience:  Children Joining instructions:  <p> Online booking is essential,<br /> Any problems with booking contact us on 01743 284280<br /> Our family events are very popular and often get fully booked, so please book to avoid disappointment.<br /> &nbsp;</p> Fully booked:  No Cancelled:  No Other details Mobility:  Not suitable for people with limited mobility Wheelchair:  Not suitable for wheelchair users Dogs:  Yes – Dogs on lead welcome Address Location:  Alderford, Tilstock Road , County:  Shropshire Postcode:  SY13 3JQ Town:  Whitchurch

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Categories: Monitor

Introduction to Poland's Vegetative Key

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 14:24
Date / Time Start date:  29 July 2017 - 9:30am - 30 July 2017 - 4:30pm Summary:  Through this two-day course you'll learn how The Vegetative Key "works", develop your knowledge of botanical terms, learn how to use the keys correctly (as well as learning a few shortcuts to ID), gain in confidence in identifying plants without flowers. This course will assume that you have some knowledge of botany and botanical terms but that you have limited knowledge of using The Vegetative Key. Book online at www.attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk/book. Booking details Booking required?:  No Admission charge:  Yes Admission details:  £90 per person Audience:  Adults Contact name:  Attenborough Nature Centre Contact number:  0115 972 1777 Contact email:  enquiries@attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk Fully booked:  No Cancelled:  No Other details Mobility:  People with limited mobility please contact organiser in advance Wheelchair:  Wheelchair users please contact organiser in advance Location Meeting place:  Attenborough Nature Centre Address Location:  Attenborough Nature Reserve County:  Nottingham Postcode:  NG9 6DY Grid ref:  SK515339 Town:  Attenborough
Categories: Monitor

National Vegetation Classification

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 14:16
Date / Time Start date:  11 July 2017 - 9:00am - 4:00pm Summary:  The National Vegetation Classification Scheme (NVC) was developed in the 1990s and is seen as one of the main ways of classifying habitats using vegetation recorded within quadrats. You will learn about the background to the NVC, how it is used and can be interpreted, how to carry out an NVC survey and how to analyse NVC data. Includes classroom and practical elements. Tutor: Debbie Alston CIEEM. Book online at www.attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk/book. Main image:  Booking details Booking required?:  No Admission charge:  Yes Admission details:  £45 per person Audience:  Adults Contact name:  Attenborough Nature Centre Contact number:  0115 972 1777 Contact email:  enquiries@attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk Fully booked:  No Cancelled:  No Other details Mobility:  People with limited mobility please contact organiser in advance Wheelchair:  Wheelchair users please contact organiser in advance Location Meeting place:  Attenborough Nature Centre Address Location:  Attenborough Nature Reserve County:  Nottingham Postcode:  NG9 6DY Grid ref:  SK515339 Town:  Attenborough
Categories: Monitor

Volunteer Wildlife Watch Club Helper

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 14:13

Could you spare a few hours a month to help run the Queenswood Wildlife Watch club? We require some extra help to run this exciting wildlife club for young people.

The club takes place on the first Sunday of every month at Queenswood Country Park, from 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm. Activities include forest skills, moth trapping, bat walks, autumn activities, hibernation and natural Christmas crafts, owl pellet dissection, animal tracking, bird watching plus more. Plenty to learn with this wildlife crazy bunch! Free training given.

Job reference:  WWH Salary:  n/a Closing date:  1 December 2017 (All day) Contact details:  <p> For more information please contact Hayley Herridge <a href="mailto:h.herridge@herefordshirewt.co.uk">h.herridge@herefordshirewt.co.uk</a></p> Location:  Queenswood Country Park, Dinmore Hill, Nr. Leominster, HR6 0PY

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Categories: Monitor

Phase I Habitat Surveys

Wildlife Trusts - Fri, 23/06/2017 - 14:04
Date / Time Start date:  10 July 2017 - 9:00am - 4:00pm Summary:  This course covers the essential techniques required to assess wildlife habitats and sites using Phase I Habitat Surveys. This is suited to anyone wishing to carry out basic ecological surveys in relation to conservation, site management, planning and development. Includes practical application of the techniques on Attenborough Nature Reserve. Tutor: Debbie Alston CIEEM. Book online at www.attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk/book. Main image:  Booking details Booking required?:  No Admission charge:  Yes Admission details:  £45 per person Audience:  Adults Contact name:  Attenborough Nature Centre Contact number:  0115 972 1777 Contact email:  enquiries@attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk Fully booked:  No Cancelled:  No Other details Mobility:  People with limited mobility please contact organiser in advance Wheelchair:  Wheelchair users please contact organiser in advance Location Meeting place:  Attenborough Nature Centre Address Location:  Attenborough Nature Reserve County:  Nottingham Postcode:  NG9 6DY Grid ref:  SK515339 Town:  Attenborough
Categories: Monitor

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