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Skylark

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A once common farmland bird that has diminished in numbers considerably. Noted for its wonderful song.


 

Photograph by: 

March can seem like one fine day followed by four or more less kind. If you go up on to the Dorset sea cliffs or the Purbeck Ridge on one of those lovely March days not only are you rewarded with the most wonderful of views but you will also be serenaded by the joyful song of the skylark (Alauda arvensis).

I am not too good on Latin but 'laud' means to praise and 'arvensis' means 'of the field' so I like to think that the skylark's scientific name, Alauda arvensis, means the 'praise from the meadow' ... room for a bit of emotion in science perhaps? I love the song of the skylark; they always seem so enthusiastic and so happy with life. Nature holds many joys for me and the skylark's song is certainly up there near the top.

Sadly, this once common bird has diminished in numbers considerably in the last thirty years or so. It is certainly vulnerable to disturbance and, as it nests on the ground, its young are prone to accidental trampling by people, dogs, tractors and cattle but this would not account for the current decline. This is almost certainly down to less insects to feed to its young due the amount of insecticide used in crop sprays.

This trend in farmland bird populations is a familiar one. You can wipe a population out very quickly but it takes decades to build up a new one.


 

The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail:

Sites List Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes
Common Name Skylark
Scientific Name Alauda arvensis
Status Occasional
Interest Level
2
Species Family Flycatchers and Larks
Visible
  • 01 - January
  • 02 - February
  • 03 - March
  • 04 - April
  • 05 - May
  • 06 - June
  • 07 - July
  • 08 - August
  • 09 - September
  • 10 - October
  • 11 - November
  • 12 - December
Preferred Environment
  • Downland and scrub
Look for The sound of its song coming from high above you
Additional Identification Notes
  • Now gone from much of the farmland in Dorset and found mainly on the open downs
  • In spring the male ascends vertically into the air singing as it goes 
  • Rarely seen on the ground because of the choice of location of their nests