domgreves: One of yesterday's Emperor Moths settled for close-up views. @savebutterflies @BC_Dorset @DorsetWildlife @ukmoths https://t.co/V2x9imvaqK

domgreves: One of yesterday's Emperor Moths settled for close-up views. @savebutterflies @BC_Dorset @DorsetWildlife @ukmoths https://t.co/V2x9imvaqK

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Fact File: 
Common Name Emperor Moth
Scientific Name Pavonia pavonia
Interest Level
4/5
Related Species Other Macro Moths
Look for
Habitat Reference H1: Dry Heath
Summary

If there is one species of moth I would love to see it has to be the emperor moth. Although the male flies by day in April and May and is quite common, apparently, on our local heathland, I have so far only ever found the larvae or caterpillar. The primary food plant of the larvae is heather altough they can also be found on shrubs such as hawthorn, blackthorn and sallow.

This is a striking moth with big eyes on both the forewaings and the underwings which must look a bit scary to potential preditors. Quite unmistakable if you are lucky enough to see one.


 

 

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These are some photographs of this species that have accompanied tweets from Twitter contributors. Click/tap a photo to see the original version.

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RT @anna_allum: Look at the antennae of this male emperor moth. Another beautiful creature from @RSPBArne https://t.co/WdCx9XiwP5
Tweet Date:
24/04/2017 - 21:15
Contributed By:
One of yesterday's Emperor Moths settled for close-up views. @savebutterflies @BC_Dorset @DorsetWildlife @ukmoths https://t.co/V2x9imvaqK
Tweet Date:
17/05/2017 - 13:15
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